The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation awarded it’s annual fellowships to 180 of 3,000 applicants. Eight of them this year where given to artists working with photography including Richard Mosse who we featured in the series Photojournalism at the Crossroads.
When working on his project in eastern Congo, photographer Richard Mosse chose to shoot with infrared film. “Kodak Aerochrome,” Mosse explains, “is a recently discontinued military surveillance technology, developed during the Cold War with the primary objective of perceiving camouflaged enemy installations hidden in the landscape. The use of analog infrared film in eastern Congo evokes the specificity of that medium, its genesis as a military technology and its potential to reveal the invisible.”
May 24, 2011 / 6 notes

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation awarded it’s annual fellowships to 180 of 3,000 applicants. Eight of them this year where given to artists working with photography including Richard Mosse who we featured in the series Photojournalism at the Crossroads.

When working on his project in eastern Congo, photographer Richard Mosse chose to shoot with infrared film. “Kodak Aerochrome,” Mosse explains, “is a recently discontinued military surveillance technology, developed during the Cold War with the primary objective of perceiving camouflaged enemy installations hidden in the landscape. The use of analog infrared film in eastern Congo evokes the specificity of that medium, its genesis as a military technology and its potential to reveal the invisible.”




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